Author Topic: Neoclassical Poetry  (Read 3788 times)

bloody

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Neoclassical Poetry
« on: Jul 23, 2017, 07:32 AM »
Blind-Spots

Where is my self-control? And, how can I trust
Myself with these blind-spots? It's much like
I'm trapped within some reoccurring dream,
Where each and every step I take, I take,
Obliviously, to the same destination
Laid out before me, yet I know not why
I'm compelled, onward, to the same old place.
What hope is there for me in all of this?
Oh, how I need to search within myself,
And look for what is leading me astray,
And, just maybe, one day I will awake.
« Last Edit: Jul 23, 2017, 09:39 PM by bloody »

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #1 on: Jul 23, 2017, 09:21 PM »
Note: Did a major revision to 'Blind-Spots.'

Offline Índigo flow

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #2 on: Jul 23, 2017, 10:04 PM »
K

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #3 on: Jul 23, 2017, 10:59 PM »
Blind-Spots

Where is my self-control? And, how can I trust
Myself with these blind-spots? It's much like
I'm trapped within some reoccurring dream,
Where each and every step I take, I take,
Obliviously, to the same destination
Laid out before me, yet I know not why
I'm compelled, onward, to the same old place.
What hope is there for me in all of this?
Oh, how I need to search within myself,
And look for what is leading me astray,
And, just maybe, one day I will awake.

Here's a line to line metaphor: You need complete details for the right perception.

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #4 on: Jul 23, 2017, 11:04 PM »
There's a great deal of Miltonic form philosophy behind this poem, hence 'Blind-Spots,' seeing Milton was blind.

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #5 on: Jul 23, 2017, 11:18 PM »
Blind-Spots

Where is my self-control? And, how can I trust
Myself with these blind-spots? It's much like
I'm trapped within some reoccurring dream,
Where each and every step I take, I take,
Obliviously, to the same destination
Laid out before me, yet I know not why
I'm compelled, onward, to the same old place.
What hope is there for me in all of this?
Oh, how I need to search within myself,
And look for what is leading me astray,
And, just maybe, one day I will awake.


More about my poem 'Blind-Spots'; Thought you might like to know... Eurydice.

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #6 on: Jul 23, 2017, 11:58 PM »
Once you shy away from the light, one almost always stays heading that way. Orpheus and Eurydice helps me focus on progress instead. <3

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #7 on: Aug 02, 2017, 08:00 PM »
I want to make a more dedicated shift in my work towards neoclassical poetry. I'm really interested in mythology, and would like to learn the skills needed to write in classic forms, specifically in the Gothic manner. All Gothic really means to me is 'atmosphere/scenery based' but usually depends on grim or dire imagery to heighten that effect, a heightened awareness of the scene. I should have no problem learning the necessary skills, but it will take time, lots of time...

But, for a start, I purchased audiobooks of 'Paradise Lost', so that I can listen and learn to think in meter, and 'Frankenstein' to help me learn elevated language, and write Gothic takes on myths. So, I may not be writing much in the weeks to come, because I need to dedicate the bulk of my time to intensive studies.

Hopefully by this winter I'll be pumping out some interesting poetry.

I've also obtained audiobooks of 'The House of the Seven Gables' 'The Scarlet Letter' and 'War of the Worlds'... I'm immensely excited to rediscover elevated language. Today, I've decided, my primary studies will be of elevated language, specifically 19th Century literature. :)
« Last Edit: Aug 03, 2017, 05:36 AM by bloody »

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #8 on: Aug 03, 2017, 05:29 PM »
In the ensuing months, you will see a new poetic arise in my work, but really it's a return to my roots.

Delving so deep into modern modes has butchered my poetics profusely, and I simply desire to return to the likes of my golden age of prosperity.

I sacrificed my love and passions of neoclassicism, to make a more accessible body of work... if it weren't so unselfish I would be ashamed.

I believe there is a place for neoclassicism, and I no longer feel obligated to conform to modern means of communication and poetics. Please, be patient with me as I get back on track.


bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #9 on: Aug 03, 2017, 05:56 PM »
I'm going to go away for a few months and put together a body of work before I return to share anything. That way I can focus on creating a more presentable body of work, without posting stuff before it's time. That's how I used to work, and my work thrived for it.

See ya in a couple months.

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #10 on: Aug 06, 2017, 12:33 AM »
In the ensuing months, you will see a new poetic arise in my work, but really it's a return to my roots.

Delving so deep into modern modes has butchered my poetics profusely, and I simply desire to return to the likes of my golden age of prosperity.

I sacrificed my love and passions of neoclassicism, to make a more accessible body of work... if it weren't so unselfish I would be ashamed.

I believe there is a place for neoclassicism, and I no longer feel obligated to conform to modern means of communication and poetics. Please, be patient with me as I get back on track.

I wait. I'd prefer something as Fernando Pessoa. This socially weirdo, wrote the finest verses. He was such a virtuoso of poetry that he could not be content with his style: he had to have several diverse styles, which he pretended were written by different people (his "heteronyms"). He crafted the biographies of these "other selves" so well that for a time his readership believed them real. One of his heteronyms was a half-Scottish engineer who wrote futuristic verse, other was a barely literate countryman who had never been introduced to religion, another was a Latinist and a monarchist. A poet who could fake to have multiple personalities and wrote extensively as each of them. The beginnings of Portuguese poetry go back to the early 12th century. Explore them and Portuguese history.


The Portuguese Empire, also known as the Portuguese Overseas, was the 1st global empire in History and the 1st modern colonial European power, starting in 1415 with the conquest of Ceuta in Morocco, over 500 years after Portugal's foundation as a country in 868 and its establishment as a kingdom by the Templars in 1139, becoming Europe's first nation-state. In addition, it was the longest-lived of the modern European colonial empires, spanning nearly six centuries, until its end in 1999 with the handover of Macau (China) or the grant of sovereignty to East Timor in 2002, making it the longest global empire in History. Portuguese conquistadors, navigators, explorers, scientists, monks, templars and knights, sailed and battled their way through Africa, America, the Middle East and Asia, expanding their kingdom in search for trade, settlement, wealth, slaves, spreading of Christianity, and to unlock the secrets of the earlier stages of Christendom. Thanks to this, Portugal held dominion over the sea lanes of the Indian and South Atlantic oceans for over a century, making its economic, military and political power the rival of any in Europe. Portuguese domain was present in Africa, within Morocco, Angola, Mozambique, Guinea and also in Saudi Arabia, Iran, Brazil, Canada, Greenland and several parts of Asia, including India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Japan, and several others. "The Portuguese were the first Europeans after the Dark Ages to engage in transcultural and transoceanic warfare, equipped with a blend of nautical knowledge, superior technology, incredible courage, very few men, and great swordsmanship that proved very efficient against the curved blades of the Turks and Moors. One must be aware that the Portuguese knew they were always outnumbered, a certainty that led them to employ all their courage and determination in the fights and battles they engaged. In many cases, just mentioning the Portuguese would distress an entire army or fleet, knowing the fierceness and bravery of the Portuguese warriors." — Rainer Daehnhardt (Professor, Historian, Writer.) ---------- Portuguese genes It was discovered, not so long ago, that the Lusitanians, ancestors of the Portuguese, owned two unique genes that are not found anywhere else in the world, except in Portugal. • A25-BIS-DR2 • A26-B38-DR13 A26-B38-DR13 is the most ancient gene of mankind and A25-BIS-DR2 is a very rare one also found only in Portugal and its descendants abroad.Thi was a discovery which brought a lot of attention in the world of genetics and racial studies. According to it, it was able to prove the Portuguese have the oldest genetic code in the world. “A33B14-DR1 is found in Mediterraneans, but not in Basques or Portuguese, reflecting the relative lack of contact with Mediterraneans common to both Basques and Portuguese; these latter groups also share one of the highest frequencies of the Rh phenotype. A25B18-DR15 is only found in Portugal among Europeans; it is also observed in white North Americans and in Brazilians (Imanishi et al. 1992b). It is probably a marker for the ancient Portuguese people in Europe and for people of Portuguese descent in America. A26-B38-DR13 is a specific Portuguese marker not found in any other part of the world, and it probably existed in the first western Iberians. Therefore, Portuguese is a relatively distinct population among Iberians according to our HLA data. They seem not to have had a significant contribution to their genetic pool from paleo-North Africans (A30-B18) and Mediterraneans (A33-B14) on the one hand, and on the other hand they show two specific haplotypes, A25-B18-DR2 and A26-B38DR13. Portuguese people have also maintained a certain degree of cultural and ethnic-specific characteristics since ancient times. Portuguese and Basques do not show the Mediterranean A33-B14-DR1 haplotype, suggesting a lower admixture with Mediterraneans; Spaniards and Algerians do have this haplotype in a relatively high frequency, indicating a more extensive Mediterranean genetic influence. The paleo-North African haplotype A30-B18-DR3 present in Basques, Algerians, and Spaniards is not found in Portuguese either. The Portuguese have a characteristic unique among world populations: a high frequency of HLA-A25-B18-DR15 and A26-B38-DR13, which may reflect a still detectable founder effect coming from ancient Portuguese.” Source: “Relatedness among Basques, Portuguese, Spaniards, and Algerian studied by HLA allelic frequencies and haplotypes.”

Most epic battles similar to the the fierce resistance of the spartans but unknown to the general population were the Siege of Chaul where 1200 portuguese won against 150,000 muslims, the Great Siege of Mazagăo where 800 portuguese defeated 105,000 muslims and the siege of Goa where 2000 portuguese resisted against 97,000 muslims... Crazy numbers over here. Also, everyone talks about the gaelic resistance to the romans but the romans took 2 centuries to conquer the territory which was occupied by celtic tribes back then, which now is Portugal. Portugal and Spain were the countries which spread the most the christian faith around the globe.
« Last Edit: Aug 06, 2017, 12:35 AM by people are people »

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #11 on: Aug 07, 2017, 08:01 PM »
Interesting... but I have already decided on what I want to work on in these first steps of this new phase of my career. These next couple months I've chosen to take the time to write a mini-epic tragedy themed 'self-reliance vs provision.' :)

Note: Further details will be available as work progresses, as to not leave you completely in the dark, for this will be a long process.
« Last Edit: Aug 07, 2017, 08:14 PM by bloody »

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #12 on: Aug 07, 2017, 08:17 PM »
Also, I don't want to get into the 'nature vs nurture' argument, but I believe culture is the dominating factor in shaping a people, and not ethnicity.

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #13 on: Aug 07, 2017, 08:22 PM »
Whether or not ethnicity encourages and strengthens the desire to maintain cultural bonds is another topic entirely.

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #14 on: Aug 07, 2017, 10:11 PM »
Funny this would become an issue, because it's part of the core theme of the mini-epic i'm writing...

'My people are better than your people' is so prevalent a thinking error in society. How does this fit in with the theme 'self-reliant vs provision?'

The truth is we are shaped by the world around us, the cultures in which we live, but we can be thankful of our own without attacking that of others.

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #15 on: Aug 07, 2017, 11:31 PM »
Just to change the subject...

I've been so focused on studies this year that I couldn't be bothered with writing anything substantial, but now I'm taking time for writing.

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #16 on: Aug 08, 2017, 12:24 AM »
I'm just sharing with you cool stuff from Portugal, and some history ::) people don't care about, I've managed to shed some light on this for you.... Discussions about racism/ethnicity should be all-inclusive and open to people of all skin colors. However, to put it simply, sometimes some people lack the experience or education that can provide a rudimentary foundation from which a productive conversation can be built. This is not necessarily the fault of the individual, but pervasive myths and misinformation have dominated mainstream racial discourse and often times, the important issues are never highlighted...Just to change the subject... Take your time. Yeah, mate. It's all good.

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #17 on: Aug 09, 2017, 02:01 AM »
This is what I'm working on... Seeing how much violence humanity has displayed attacking and defending belief systems... Pride isn't a problem as much as 'wounded pride.' It's personal to be told we're wrong, and it leads to disputes, even violence, especially when anger isn't checked. I'm glad we can be level headed over these discussions. Nothing wrong with a discussion, or even disagreement, it's a lost art. :)

Cain and Abel
« Last Edit: Aug 09, 2017, 02:04 AM by bloody »

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #18 on: Aug 09, 2017, 02:10 AM »
Don't get me wrong, I was completely open to what you were saying until the list of victories over foreign invaders. That, to me, was a bit condescending, and don't know why it was relevant to the racial lineages. Were it not for that, I would have said nothing.

bloody

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Re: Neoclassical Poetry
« Reply #19 on: Aug 09, 2017, 02:14 AM »
Mixing those two, in such close proximity, was rather tasteless to me. With so much history to present, having coupled those two facts, right next to each other, didn't jive with me. But I understand an importance of learning history.